US Supplies Shrinking in Afghanistan!

Discussion in 'Pakistan's War Against TTP' started by batmannow, Feb 2, 2009.

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  1. batmannow

    batmannow ELITE MEMBER

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    US Supplies Shrinking in Afghanistan
    February 02, 2009
    Chicago Tribune

    KABUL, Afghanistan -- The milk is now pulled from the mess hall by 9 a.m., to ration the limited supply.

    At the Camp Phoenix base store nearby, the shelves look bare. There's no Irish Spring Body Wash, no Doritos, no Tostitos Scoops, no Bayer Aspirin.

    "We're having the same problems all over Afghanistan," said Randy Barnes, who manages warehouses for the Army & Air Force Exchange Service, which operates stores at many of the bases where U.S. troops are deployed in the war on terror here.


    For the Soldiers at Camp Phoenix, about 650 of whom are from the Illinois National Guard, the missing supplies underscore what senior military officials have been saying for months: U.S. and coalition troops must find new routes to supply what will be a rapidly growing force in Afghanistan, ones that avoid the treacherous border areas of Pakistan where convoys have been ambushed.

    Supplying an army in any war is crucial; it's not just bullets and bombs, but everything from fuel to lettuce, that must be shipped in by the ton and the truckload. And a country like Afghanistan -- landlocked, mountainous and with few good roads -- poses enormously difficult challenges even without attacks by militants.
    Gen. David Petraeus, the chief of U.S. Central Command, announced late last month that the military had reached transit deals with Russia and several Central Asian states to the north of Afghanistan, to provide an alternate route from Pakistan. But it's not yet clear whether any new route would be able to absorb the heavy traffic.

    "It is very important as we increase the effort in Afghanistan that we have multiple routes that go into the country," Petraeus said.


    President Barack Obama has made the fight against militants in Pakistan and Afghanistan -- rather than in Iraq -- his top priority in the war on terror. His administration is expected to send as many as 30,000 more U.S. troops to Afghanistan in the coming months.

    The supply-route challenge is politically sensitive; as long as the U.S. and coalition troops depend on Pakistan to move supplies, it's difficult to be too critical of its government's help in the war on terror. Some in Washington have questioned Pakistan's commitment.

    But a route through Russia and neighboring countries is not necessarily a long-term solution either. The over-land route is much longer and more expensive, and dealing with repressive regimes in Central Asia also could pose political dilemmas.
    ;):tup::lol:

    Sensitive military goods, such as weapons and ammunition, are transported by military convoy or air, and have not been hurt by supply-route problems, officials say. Air transport for non-combat goods is prohibitively expensive and also logistically difficult.
    Right now, subcontractors transport about 75 percent of non-sensitive military goods for U.S. troops and a smaller but significant amount for NATO troops from the port in Karachi, Pakistan, through the Torkham border crossing into Afghanistan. About 125 shipping containers pass through that crossing daily. :eek:
    It's the shortest route to Kabul and Bagram Air Base, the largest U.S. base in Afghanistan, yet it goes through narrow roads, mountain passes and hostile areas. :undecided:

    Despite the risk, security is often lax. In recent months, Taliban-led militants have frequently attacked the military shipping containers, often stored by these subcontractors just outside Peshawar, Pakistan, in five ramshackle yards with little security and no barbed wire. Militants have destroyed more than 300 shipping containers so far, torching at least 80 Humvees for the Afghan National Army.

    Pakistani officials blamed the subcontractors for sacrificing security for profit.

    "There are two or three guards, no lights, no cameras. An office consists of an empty container, two broken-down chairs, no phone and no fax line," said Tariq Hayat Khan, the political agent for Khyber tribal agency, which includes the main road from Peshawar to Torkham. "By no stretch of the imagination can you call them shipping terminals. They've just started leveling fields and stacking containers. All they do is charge money and deliver from Point A to Point B."

    Because of the escalating number of attacks, Pakistan has suspended traffic through this crossing three times in the past seven weeks to launch offensives against militants. At the other major crossing in Pakistan, through Chaman in Baluchistan province, tribesmen blockaded the road for five days recently because a tribesman was killed, stranding hundreds of trucks and fuel tankers.
    Barnes said some of the destroyed containers set on fire near Peshawar were bound for stores at U.S. military bases. He said his company was still determining what was lost.

    In a roadside bomb attack on the route a couple weeks ago, four shipping containers filled with "near beer," soda and water for the troops were hit, dooming the entire shipment bound for Camp Phoenix and Camp Eggers, said Lt. Col. Eric Little, 37, of Springfield, the garrison commander for Camp Phoenix.

    Only at the end of January -- a month late -- did the last of 21 shipping containers with the personal goods of Illinois National Guard Soldiers arrive at Camp Phoenix.

    "The majority of stuff makes it from Point A to Point B -- but not necessarily timely," said Little, adding that finding other supply routes was a necessity.

    Taliban-led militants are not the only ones to blame. Some drivers are known to steal fuel and supplies from the trucks, or fake militant attacks and sell the goods, commonly available at markets in Kabul and near Bagram. Islamic holidays and tribal conflicts have also been used as an excuse for the massive delays.

    Although the supply-route problems are not yet hurting the military effort here, they affect daily life at the bases, at least at Camp Phoenix, usually one of the most well-stocked because it is in the capital.

    "I've never seen the store this empty, ever," said Ula Loi, the store manager.

    The troops can still get medicine from the medical tents, where the stocked supplies are plentiful, so the only immediate shortages are quality-of-life ones, which probably won't win much sympathy from Soldiers in more remote bases. Still, most snacks, half the beauty products, and all the adapter plugs and combination locks are sold out.

    Last week, several Illinois National Guard Soldiers complained about the empty shelves -- one traded a pack of spare razor blades for a bag of chips, neither of which were available.

    "They don't even have any Vaseline," said 2nd Lt. Michael Quam, 27, from Dubuque, Iowa, who wanted Vaseline for an Afghan friend whose wife just had a baby.:eek::lol:
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  2. waraich66

    waraich66 FULL MEMBER

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    Afghanistan is land lock country weather is also hard ,American should now adopt talaban life style because honey moon period is now over.::woot:
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  3. metalfalcon

    metalfalcon SENIOR MEMBER

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    Co-operate with Pakistan POSITIVELY and don't show attitude, stop hitting our Tribal areas and Stop accusing Pakistan for Your Failures in Afghanistan. If America will do this they will get all the Home deliveries of KFC, Mc Donalds and Pizza Hut Fresh and hot.

    Otherwise They better adopt to Afghan way of Living and they must start keeping sheeps and Goats. BYE BYE :wave: American way of Life.

    Taliban wont spare you even there, GOOD LUCK

    OK lets see who committed central Asians countries and RUSSIA will be. America must not forget that time when they played the same game with the Russians and now you think Russians have forgot their wounds. They will take full advantage of American Weaknesses and Deliver the same Painful Punch which Russia got in 1980's.

    Yeah i saw those ruins of American supplies.

    Well its HARAM in Afghanistan and they wont let you drink it on their Soil. I think it would have been the greatest BLOW to soldiers who were desperately waiting for Some BEER and SODA. They didn't mind loosing Humvees and Choppers but this is a great loss to them. How can Stone Cold Live Without Beer.

    Well that will count for your own poor Intelligence, you don't know How Pathans make deals.

    During British time Local Tribesmen made a deal with the British that they will allow the laying down of the Railway track and when the railway track was laid down they stopped the Train and Told British that Movement of Train was not in the Contract.

    Vaseline, Why don't they other these products from E BAY. They are not friendly to Afghans.
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  4. Bezerk

    Bezerk PDF THINK TANK: CONSULTANT

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    SEVEN consecutive posts, Metalfalcon?

    Are you alright?
  5. batmannow

    batmannow ELITE MEMBER

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    ALL i can say is this, USA is going down , mently, physicaly, & now economicly!
    WOT is reaching its ultimate end, & as usall pakistan will be left alone, with some sanctions, or some kind of limited support.:tsk::lol:

    US troops are in bad moral, tired & adictted to drugs, they really wanted to go back to thier homes, but US policy makers arent realizing any thing at all, it is going to be a worst defet, worst thn "VIETNAM", i guss , but pakistan wouldbe on the reciving end! once again:tsk::cry::disagree:
  6. batmannow

    batmannow ELITE MEMBER

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    Nato supply route closed after attack
    DAWN NEWS/BETA

    Tuesday, 03 Feb, 2009 | 04:00 PM PST


    PESHAWAR: Suspected militants blew up a key bridge in northwest Pakistan, suspending a crucial supply line for Nato troops in Afghanistan for at least one day, an official said.:eek:

    The 30 metre iron bridge in Khyber district, built on a culvert under the British Raj, was blown up at 6:00 am and all traffic on the road has come to a standstill, official Tariq Hayat told AFP.
    A security official said work was already underway to repair the bridge and restore the flow of traffic on what is the only route through Khyber. ‘The traffic will be restored at least by tomorrow,’ another local official, Rahat Gul, said.
    :undecided:
    The bulk of supplies and equipment required by Nato and US-led forces battling a Taliban insurgency in neighbouring Afghanistan is shipped through Pakistan via the historic Khyber Pass. Militants have stepped up attacks on the crucial route into Afghanistan since last year in an attempt to deprive international forces fighting the Taliban of fuel and other supplies trucked in from Pakistan.:azn:
    General David Petraeus, a key advocate of a US troop surge in Afghanistan under new president Barack Obama, said deals involving Central Asian states and Russia were in place to safeguard extra routes.:disagree::lol:
  7. Pk_Thunder

    Pk_Thunder SENIOR MEMBER

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    Kyrgyzstan moves to shut key US base

    Wednesday, 04 Feb, 2009 | 03:47 PM PST |
    BISHKEK: The Kyrgyz government on Wednesday approved the closure of a US air base on its territory, hastening the end of a vital supply route for NATO forces in Afghanistan.
    Kyrgyz President Kurmanbek Bakiyev had announced in Moscow a day earlier that his government had decided to shut down the Manas air base, whose location deep in former Soviet territory has annoyed Russia.
    The government then rapidly approved a bill ordering the closure of the Manas base outside the capital Bishkek and would now submit the text to parliament, government spokesman Marat Kydyraliev said.
    The bill 'is about the cancellation of the agreement with the United States over the presence in Kyrgyzstan of the American air base,' he told AFP.
    He added that the parliament was expected to debate the bill on Thursday.
    But the US Embassy in Bishkek said that it had not received any notification that Bishkek was ordering the closure of the Manas air base.
    'Discussions will continue,' the embassy said in a statement. 'We have a broad range of programs and interests we will continue to pursue with the government and people of Kyrgyzstan.'
    The base had been set up to assist coalition forces fighting to oust the Taliban from Afghanistan in the wake of the September 11, 2001 attacks but Bishkek has expressed frustration it had continued to exist so long.
    'Eight years have passed since the agreement was signed. Over that period the threat that existed has been removed. This is one of the fundamental reasons for the cancellation of the agreement,' the Kyrgyz government said.
    According to the text of the original agreement, Kyrgyzstan must give the United States six months to shut down the base after informing of its closure.
    On his visit to Russia, Bakiyev announced the US base would be closed as he was promised more than two billion dollars in loans and aid from Moscow to assist his nation nation struggling in the face of the global economic crisis.
    Neither Russian President Dmitry Medvedev nor the Kyrgyz leader publicly linked the base's closure to the aid and the Russian leader stressed in the Kremlin the issue was Kyrgyzstan's domestic affair.
    Observers say, however, that Russia had made it clear that its financial assistance would come in return for the base's closure.
    After the Kremlin talks, Bakiyev complained that the United States had been less than forthcoming in giving aid in compensation for Bishkek's hosting of the base.
    An increasingly assertive Russia, which has its own military base in Kyrgyzstan, has been annoyed by the presence of a US military base deep in its former Soviet backyard. The base is home to more than 1,000 US personnel.
    Alexei Malashenko, a Central Asia expert at the Carnegie Moscow Centre, questioned Bakiyev's readiness to shut down the base, suggesting he was acting under pressure to ensure the best possible deal for his impoverished nation.
    'Bakiyev wants to have his cake and eat it too,' said Russian officials also emphasised that a final decision on the aid to Kyrgyzstan had yet to be made.
    'Terms for the main loan have not been agreed upon so far,' Ria-Novosti news agency quoted a source in the Russian finance ministry as saying.
    Some expressed confidence that Washington would manage to convince Bakiyev to backtrack on his pledge.
    Nur Omarov, a Bishkek-based political analyst, cited sources as saying representatives of the US State Department were expected in Bishkek later this week.
    'Bakiyev will have to make a difficult choice between Russia, the United States and China. Because China, just like Russia, is also interested in seeing this base shut down.'